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Ebele Anidi

Associate Director

Ebele Anidi has extensive experience in public health, education, and systems thinking. He has worked with a diverse range of clients to address pressing social challenges related to population health, economic mobility, gender equity, early childhood education, and mitigating barriers to success for opportunity youth. Before joining FSG, Ebele served as a middle school teacher with the Teach for America corps in Chicago. Driven by a commitment to accelerate progress towards more equitable outcomes for historically marginalized groups, Ebele pursued an MSPH with a focus on systems thinking and systems change before working as a consultant with the World Health Organization (WHO). Ebele is interested in the application of systems thinking as a tool for driving meaningful change in the interdependent spaces of public health, education, and social justice.

Before FSG

Before joining FSG, Ebele served as a middle school math teacher with the Teach for America corps in Chicago. Outside of the classroom, Ebele engaged in a leadership fellowship focused on developing a value-based theory of change with local community leaders to address persistent barriers to quality educational outcomes for children across the city. Ebele also worked as a consultant with the World Health Organization (WHO) where he supported projects across the WHO’s Implementation Research Platform, Global Observatory on Health Research & Development, and Alliance for Health Policy & Systems Research.

Education

  • Harvard University, AB in History of Medicine & Global Health Policy
  • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, MSPH in Health Systems

Languages

  • French (conversational)

On working at FSG

“At FSG, I have the privilege of working with people who are deeply committed to developing ambitious and innovative strategies to achieve transformational change at a systems level. I feel fortunate to be involved in cross-sector initiatives centered on accelerating progress towards more equitable, population-level outcomes, especially for historically marginalized groups.”