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This blog contains posts on the Collective Impact approach at FSG.
Posted by: FSG Collective Impact on 7/21/2014

By Erin White and Melissa Oomer

Both the consulting and the social sectors use an awful lot of jargon. We (the authors of this blog included) often assume that everyone in a room has the same interpretation of the words we use.

Posted by: Shijie Lu on 6/24/2014

Scope Definition in Collective Impact

If you’ve heard about collective impact, there’s a good chance you also know how collective impact efforts are defined by the existence of a “common agenda.” For collective impact efforts to work, key stakeholders need to have a shared vision for change: including a shared understanding of the problem they are trying to tackle, and what a joint approach to addressing that problem might look like.

Posted by: FSG Collective Impact on 6/16/2014

By Cara Priestley & Afi Tengue

Let me ask you a question – how often in your collective impact work have you met the community where it is? When was the last time you opened a steering committee meeting in prayer, or held it at the Martin Luther King Jr. Cultural Center or the library of a new urban middle school?

Posted by: David Phillips on 6/5/2014

Forming a steering committee and creating a common agenda is hard work.  I know this from personal experience of having supported multiple initiatives in their early stages.  For example, in Kent County, Michigan, we worked with an emerging collective impact initiative called KConnect.  Agreeing upon components of a common agenda, such as a vision statement, required steering committee members to grapple with fundamentally different ways of viewing the world (e.g., should we define our ultimate goal in terms of happiness, jobs, or graduation rates?).  Yet despite these challenges, creating a common agenda can be very inspiring because everything is possible.  After all, we don’t yet have to think about implementation!

Posted by: Srik Gopalakrishnan on 6/5/2014

In her seminal book, Leadership and the New Science, Margaret Wheatley takes a stance regarding the kind of leadership that is required in today’s world. She urges readers to stop clinging to the limits of “Newtonian” science and embrace the science of systems and complexity.  Wheatley writes,

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